Health and Vaccinations

Health and Vaccinations

Travel Advice

If you take any medication, then make sure you have enough for the whole trip and bring a copy of the prescription.

Take special care over arranging your vaccinations. Give yourself plenty of time to get fully vaccinated. Contact your G.P or call into the Health Unit for more information on what vaccinations you need.

  • Vaccinations take time. Consult your doctor or nurse as soon as possible ideally 8 weeks before departure. Late bookings can leave insufficient time for vaccinations to become fully effective.
  • Tetanus and diphtheria vaccination is important. For countries where these diseases are still common you should to receive boosters every 10 years and everyone should have completed their normal British childhood schedule.
  • There is an increasing risk of tuberculosis for those visiting many of the high-risk areas and mixing with the local population. Remember protection from BCG vaccination is only achieved after about 4-6 weeks. Boosters are not normally required.
  • Meningococcal type ACWY vaccine is advised for those visiting risk areas in sub-Saharan Africa who will be mixing closely withthe local population, as might be the case in your situation.
  • Hepatitis A and typhoid vaccines are important for those who are not able to be careful about their food and water hygiene in risk areas, asis often the case with the more adventurous traveller.
  • Japanese B encephalitis is spread by mosquitoes and is sometimes advised for those spending longer periods in risk, especially rural areas, as is often the case with the more adventurous traveller.
  • Influenza vaccine can be considered for those who might get a more severe illness such as those with existing chest problems. Remember the ‘flu’ season in the Southern Hemisphere is from April to November.
  • Rabies vaccination can be important if you are going to be more than a day or two from good medical facilities that may well be the case in your situation.
  • Yellow fever is a mosquito borne disease and occurs most commonly in jungle areas. It is therefore more likely in travellers going to remote areas. A yellow fever vaccination certificate is necessary for crossing borders in many parts of Africa and South America.
Insect Bites
Depending on what part of the world you are in, mosquitoes and ticks can spread infections and disease. Remember to take particular care between April and October when mosquitoes are most likely to be around. Try to avoid risky areas like outdoor pools and watering holes. Dress appropriately in long sleeves and minimise skin exposure. Use mosquito repellents and mosquito nets at night.
Artice by
Chris Newell